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Climate Change

A group for anyone interested in communicating about climate change. Find links, articles, original blog posts, opinions, photos, program outlines, successes and challenges. Start a discussion thread or post resources.

Members: 81
Latest Activity: Apr 17

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Some New Information

Started by Amy Brennan Mar 31. 0 Replies

There's some more information from the latest IPCC report that's come out here in the past couple of days. I figured I'd post a few links. I posted some articles from a variety of news outlets to be…Continue

Climate Change MOOCS

Started by Doug Lowthian Feb 27. 0 Replies

Upcoming MOOCS related to climate change. A MOOC is an "massive online open course".  An in-depth college level level course that is free, let's you participate to what ever level you want and come…Continue

Project AWARE

Started by Briana Crockett Feb 11. 0 Replies

I was recently scuba certified and received an email with this video about Project AWARE. Thought it was interesting to share since we will be talking some about the ocean today in class.Continue

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Comment by Michael Gabrielse on February 25, 2014 at 6:59pm

The Sustainability Toolkit - Greenbuilder Magazine '14

Hey everyone!!!  As an Alumni of SFA and this discussion (which is never over) I wanted to contribute something.  This article would be a good small group discussion.  Look it over and think from a business standpoint, from a developer, end-user, resident, elected official, and your own personal standpoint.  I have the joy of viewing it from all of these with my current job and moving forward by THINKING AHEAD for all angles is important.  Check it out.

Comment by William Dwyer on February 20, 2014 at 1:59pm

On Thursday, February 27th from 10:00-11:30 EST, you're invited to join the US National Academy of Sciences and the UK's Royal Society for the release of Climate Change: Evidence & Causes . Written by a UK-US team of leading climate scientists and reviewed by climate scientists and others, the publication is intended as a brief, readable reference document that addresses some of the questions that continue to be asked. Miles O'Brien of the PBS Newshour will moderate a discussion between some of the authors and the audience.

Participants can join in person at the NAS building on Constitution Avenue & 21st Street, NW, or by webcast. Coffee service begins at 9:00 a.m. 

Register today to attend in person or view the webcast.

 


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Comment by Doug Lowthian on August 30, 2013 at 9:59am

I think that is very funny and not a bad idea. Scientists are getting increasingly frustrated with the anti-science caucus in Congress and are stirring things up. In some interpretive arenas this type of advocacy might be actually a useful tool. In others, maybe not so much. I though it was a very creative use of science communication tools for a political policy advocacy campaign. 

Comment by Bren Curtis on August 30, 2013 at 9:30am

A little humor....naming hurricanes after doubters video  Try this!

http://www.upworthy.com/this-is-probably-the-funniest-most-effectiv...

Comment by Anita Davis on November 29, 2012 at 5:27pm

I just want to remind folks about the upcoming Earth to Sky VI Communicating Climate Change Course February 2013,  at the National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdtown, WV. The course is free to NPS FWS and BLM employees and is open to all.

Registration deadline is December 5, so don't delay! To register for the course, please visit  DOI Learn

http://www.doi.gov/doilearn/index.cfm

Here is a copy of the course announcement with more details

Training_Announcement_ETS_new_2013.pdf

And please feel free to contact me directly if you have questions.

Comment by Aubrey Hall on November 22, 2012 at 12:28pm

Here's a repeat of my recent post in the Earth to Sky group for anyone looking for climate change communication information.

One is a summary of recommendations for better climate change communication based off of a variety of literary sources (compiled from the literature review for my thesis). This document includes a small sample of the resources I used for reference.Recommendations%20for%20Better%20Climate%20Change%20Communication.docx

The second document is a summary of the "6 Americas" segments and how to communicate to these groups. Please note that this was compiled by me, and in no way was approved or reviewd by the Yale/George Mason research team.6%20americas%20briefs%20-%20no%20paragraphs.docx

Comment by John A. Veverka on November 21, 2012 at 2:06pm

If you're interested in climate change you should check out the Climate Interpreter web site:  http://www.climateinterpreter.org/

Comment by John A. Veverka on November 21, 2012 at 1:16pm

InterpNEWS, our new international heritage interpretation e-magazine will have several articles on interpreting climate change in the Jan/Feb issue.  I also invite anyone interested in doing an article on climate change interpretation for InterpNEWS to let me know.  If you would like to receive the Jan/Feb InterpNEWS just send me your e-mail address and I will add you to the mailing list - it's FREE.  [email protected]

Comment by Aubrey Hall on November 19, 2012 at 1:07pm

Comment by Jennifer Colleen Frost on November 14, 2012 at 10:29am

Great closing comment, Rachel.  I usually address things in terms of understanding that there are no absolutes in life...nothing is entirely bad or entirely good.  Everything has pros and cons.  Often, what we think is mostly positive, proves to have big negative consequences in the future once we learn more about it or learn to look at it from a different perspective.  Conversely, big problems have been resolved or minimized in ways we didn't expect or even brought benefits of its own.

I remember reading Franz Kafka's "A Country Doctor." It makes no sense until you look at it from another perspective (understanding a bit about Kafka's philosophical hobbies helps a bit, too).  The story changed dramatically once the reader's lens changed.  I think a lot of issues follow this pattern, too.  Keeping this in mind has helped me to address very controversial issues and to help others gain a new respect for the "opposition."


In saying this, I don't mean to say that we should reject our own morals, but rather we should realize that other people's truths are true for them.  I believe we gain more ground when we steer away from trying to convert others to our way of thinking and instead invite them to borrow our "glasses" for a while.  But, we have to be willing to borrow theirs, too, and respect that no one has to keep the same prescription and that our prescription may not be right for their vision.

 
 
 

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SHINEnet is a professional network for interpreters, informal educators and other like-minded professionals. SHINE stands for Sharing Heritage Interpretation News and Expertise.

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